Asymmetric vs Symmetric Vehicle Lifts Which Is Right For Me

Title:
Asymmetric vs Symmetric Vehicle Lifts Which Is Right For Me

Word Count:
1535

Summary:
When purchasing a surface mounted two-post automotive lift, it is important to decide what type of lift you will need to best suit the vehicles you want to pick up.

Keywords:
Asymmetric Vehicle Lifts, Symmetric Vehicle Lifts

Article Body:
When purchasing a surface mounted two-post automotive lift, it is important to decide what type of lift you will need to best suit the vehicles you want to pick up. An automotive lift is a tool and just as you know that a pneumatic wrench is better than a monkey wrench for changing tires, it is important for you to determine which type of lift is best suited for each type of vehicle.

Symmetrical Vehicle Lifts

Approximately 30 years ago, when cars were built out of steel, men were strong and women wore skirts…..The symmetrical lift was designed as an alternative to the hydraulic inground lift. The lift wasn’t known as “symmetrical” right off the bat; it was called a surface lift because it bolted to the concrete floor, rather than being installed through the floor. At the time of its inception, the surface lift was being designed (often times poorly) to pick up rear wheel drive vehicles that had a pretty good front to rear balance. The cars were big and heavy and mechanics relatively skinny and strong.

In order to balance these behemoths six feet up in the air, the columns were placed across from each other and the arms were all of equal length. Some lifts were connected from side-to-side overhead; a base plate connected others down below. One thing was certain about these lifts; if you were a mechanic with a beer belly trying to get out of the car after it had been driven into place, you were going to have a tough time. Since the lift was balancing the vehicle between front and back, the column needed to be located somewhat close to the center of the vehicle. What else is in the center of the vehicle? We all know the answer to that! The doors! What happens when doors meet columns? Door dings!

It took the lift manufacturers a while to figure it out, but eventually they did. Currently, very few lifts are sold as “symmetrical” lifts. The ones that are sold are usually being sold for a particular purpose, such as working on vans or trucks. (Vans and trucks have the door in front of the centerline of the vehicle, so a column really doesn’t get in the way.) Some customers will purchase a symmetrical lift because they want a “drive thru” capability, and sure enough, the symmetrical lift usually gives a few more inches in that regard.

Sure Fire Ways to Tell a Symmetrical Lift:

The columns face each other.
Front arm length is the same as rear arm length.
The lift states “symmetrical”.
You have a difficult time getting out of the car when you drive in.
You don’t have a difficult time getting out of the truck when you drive in.
You have an account with a body shop to repair door dings.

Asymmetric Vehicle Lifts

Sometimes Europeans are smarter than Americans. I don’t like to admit it, but it’s true. It turns out, some guy named G

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#which is better symmetrical or assymmetrical car lift

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